DNS Check FAQ

  1. What DNS record types are supported?
  2. Are DNS records case sensitive?
  3. How often are DNS records checked?
  4. I posted a DNS record update, but when I click "Refresh", DNS Check still shows the record as failing. Why is this?
  5. I want to allow DNS Check to query my private name server. What firewall openings should I make?
  6. Is there an option available for importing matching sets of A and PTR (forward and reverse DNS) records?
  7. I manage reverse DNS records by mapping IP addresses, rather than PTR record names to domain names. Is there any way I can import this data without having to convert each reverse DNS record to zone file format?
  8. I wish there was a feature that would....
  9. What are the differences between free and paid accounts?
  10. Do you support checking international domains that use non-ASCII characters?
  11. I have a question that's not answered here.

What DNS record types are supported?

The following types of DNS records are supported:

Both IPv4 and IPv6 are supported.

You can see examples of each in the Example DNS Check Page.

Are DNS records case sensitive?

DNS Check has the following case sensitivity behavior:

How often are DNS records checked?

DNS records are initially checked at the time that they're created. After that, they're automatically rechecked every 5 minutes.

You can also recheck a DNS record immediately by clicking its Refresh icon.

I posted a DNS record update, but when I click "Refresh", DNS Check still shows the record as failing. Why is this?

The name servers that DNS Check queries by default cache results for up to 60 seconds. If the problem persists longer than that, then your DNS server or service may be caching the old record.

I want to allow DNS Check to query my private name server. What firewall openings should I make?

DNS Check will connect to your name server on UDP, and possibly TCP port 53 from one or more of the IP addresses below:

San Francisco
  • Hostname: sfo1.dnscheck.co
  • IPv4 address: 104.236.169.228
  • IPv6 address: 2604:a880:1:20::51:c001
New York
  • Hostname: nyc1.dnscheck.co
  • IPv4 address: 104.131.72.189
  • IPv6 address: 2604:a880:800:10::7a1:b001
Ireland
  • Hostname: ireland1.dnscheck.co
  • IPv4 address: 52.48.61.155
  • IPv6 address: NA

Is there an option available for importing matching sets of A and PTR (forward and reverse DNS) records?

Yes. There's a shorthand available for this when using the zone file importer. To use the zone file importer, select Import zone file from the DNS record group page. Once there, enter your matching A and PTR (forward and reverse DNS) records using the following format:

ip-address <=> domain

For example, to import a reverse DNS record for "1.2.3.4" that maps to example.com., and an A record for example.com. that maps to "1.2.3.4", enter:

1.2.3.4 <=> example.com.

To import a reverse DNS record for example.com that maps to "2604:a880:800:10::7a1:b001", and a corresponding AAAA record, enter:

2604:a880:800:10::7a1:b001 <=> example.com.

See the "Reverse DNS Shorthand" section of our Reverse DNS (PTR) Records documentation for more information.

I manage reverse DNS records by mapping IP addresses, rather than PTR record names to domain names. Is there any way I can import this data without having to convert each reverse DNS record to zone file format?

Yes. You have two options available:

  1. Import reverse DNS records individually by selecting Add DNS Record => PTR record from the DNS record group's page. This works for both IPv4 and IPv6 reverse DNS records.
  2. Import PTR records using the zone file importer by selecting Import zone file from the DNS record group page. Once there, enter the reverse DNS records using the following format:

    ip-address => domain

    For example, to import a reverse DNS record for "1.2.3.4" that maps to example.com., enter:

    1.2.3.4 => example.com.

    To import a reverse DNS record for "2604:a880:800:10::7a1:b001" that maps to example.com., enter:

    2604:a880:800:10::7a1:b001 => example.com.

I wish there was a feature that would....

Please let us know! Use the contact page to send in a feature request, and we'll get back with you.

What are the differences between free and paid accounts?

There are four differences:

  1. The number of DNS records that you're able to check. Free accounts are able to monitor up to 10 DNS records, which is enough for many small businesses. If you would like to monitor more records, upgrading to a paid account will allow you to check up to 1,000 DNS records.
  2. With a paid account, you can optionally specify which name server(s) you would like to be queried. By default, both free and paid accounts query recursive name servers that are maintained by DNS Check.
  3. Paid accounts can be used to check A, AAAA, and CNAME record based DNS load balancers.
  4. Free accounts are limited to a maximum of 50 emailed notifications per month. Paid accounts have no limit.

Do you support checking international domains that use non-ASCII characters?

Yes. DNS Check will automatically encode non-ASCII characters for you using Punycode. Or if your international domain name is already Punycode encoded, you can enter it that way.

After an international domain is entered into DNS Check, it's displayed using Punycode encoding. We decided to present domains this way to reduce ambiguity since different Unicode characters can look very similar to one another.

I have a question that's not answered here.

Please contact us, and we'll do our best to answer your question.



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Free accounts can check up to 10 DNS records at a time. You can always upgrade to a paid account later.